Wash Your Face with a Potato?!?

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What is the Konjac Sponge?

Ever heard of a konjac sponge? It’s true the konjac sponge makes a fabulous facial treatment! Well, to start, it might be interesting to know that konjac actually comes from a potato-like plant in Asia that is both cultivated and grows wild at high altitudes. Konjac sponges are made from the dried and ground root of the konjac, that’s native to Asia. These squishy sponges are used in your cleansing routine to help you more effectively dislodge, dirt, oil, and blackheads. The Japanese have used Konjac for over 1500 years as a food source and over the last century have been using the Konjac potato as a beauty treatment. The Konjac sponge has been handmade from the vegetable fibre of this plant along with French clays and some contain pure charcoal from bamboo. As a result, the Konjac sponge is extremely gentle and 100% biodegradable – you can compost it when it’s time for a new one.

What Does the Konjac Sponge Do?

I’m a big fan of body brushing for its ability to increase circulation, exfoliate and cleanse pores. A konjac sponge is like body brushing for your face. It’s also helpful for dry patches, acne, blackheads and eczema.

Konjac naturally nourishes with vitamins A, B, C, D and E, proteins, lipids, fatty acids, copper, zinc, iron, and magnesium. This wonder veggie even has antioxidants and has historically been used to suppress tumors. Unlike other exfoliators that harm the environment, konjac is completely natural, non-toxic, and biodegradable (no harmful plastic microbeads needed!)

The Konjac sponge is an extremely gentle cleanser for both face and body. I have two separate sponges, one for my body and one for my face. The sponge acts as a gentle exfoliator, rubbing off dead skin cells in the most delicate manner. The extra soft texture means that its ok for anyone to use,  babies included (they even have a sponge for babies too!). While this won’t replace your makeup remover (eye makeup more specifically) it can gently take off much of your face makeup in a matter of minutes.

Better yet, the konjac sponge has enough innate cleansing properties on its own that some people have success using it with just water.

How Do I Use the Konjac Sponge?

When you pick up your sponge it will be dry and hard. You will need to wet it under warm water until it’s completely soaked through and soft. Once it is wet and puffy, simply use the flat side in a circular motion around your face to exfoliate and remove dirt and grime. This circular massaging will stimulate tired skin & encourage skin renewal – and we can all use a bit of that!

Konjac sponges feel finer than washcloths, and they’re softer than loofahs and many other face exfoliators. A water barrier forms over the surface of the sponge which makes it feel very slick (almost slimy), but in a good way. Because of its bouncy, rubbery texture, it makes a rich lather using less cleanser than you’d normally need with a washcloth. It dries quickly in between uses to prevent bacteria or mold from building up in it, whereas a washcloth might stay damp in between uses. When you replace them often (about 2-3 months) there’s no danger of using a dirty, moldy germ-infested sponge on your visage.

The texture is a little similar to the typical white makeup sponges.

  1. When you first get a konjac sponge you’ll notice it’s small and hard. Soak the sponge in warm water for about 15 minutes or until almost doubled in size before the first use. Once you’ve used it, it will only need soaking for a minute or two before it softens and expands to about one and a half times its size.
  2. Gently squeeze (don’t twist!) the excess water out by pressing the konjac sponge between your palms. Don’t be rough with it. Apply a small amount of cleanser (if desired), or just use the sponge plain.
  3. Rub the konjac sponge on the face in upward, circular motions. Concentrate on dry or blackhead-prone areas. It’s a mild exfoliator, so it may feel like you need to scrub hard to get it to work, but that isn’t necessary. These sponges will remove dirt, sunscreen, and even makeup. (You may need to use a little bit of coconut oil to remove heavy eye makeup though.)
  4. Rinse the konjac sponge well with cool water and gently squeeze the excess water out by pressing the sponge between your palms. Don’t twist, wring, or pull on it.
  5. Hang it to dry, or put it on a rack so there’s airflow. Alternately, you can keep the sponge in a sealed container in your fridge. Make sure to store it away from light and humidity. Right next to your steamy shower isn’t the best option.

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How Long Will My Sponge Last & How to Care for It?

Like all good things, it must come to an end, but not for at least 2 – 3 months depending on how you care for it. By ensuring that it completely dries out in between uses (there is a handy string for that) and that your sponge is never wrung out (always press between your hands to remove excess water during use), you will give your sponge a longer life.

Make sure that before and after each use, you rinse the sponge well – you can disinfect your sponge every other week by boiling it for a few minutes (but don’t do this too often, as again it will break down the fibers faster).

When it starts to break apart and deteriorate, it is time for a  new sponge. Simply compost this sponge (it is 100% natural material, and completely safe – and earth friendly – to do so). You can even put it in the bottom of a potted plant to help retain moisture in the soil – yes, it is that natural!

I am in love with this product, so I would love to hear from any of you who have used the Konjac Sponge.

Now that you know what they are, why wait… pick one up for yourself here!

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Till next time………………..

 

 

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